People

Faculty - Psychology/Identity

João Biehl
Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology
Department Chair
Director, Brazil LAB
Office Phone
Office
128 Aaron Burr Hall

João Biehl is Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology and Faculty Associate at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. Biehl’s main research and teaching interests center on medical and political anthropology, ethnography and critical theory, the social studies of science and technology, global health, pharmaceuticals, affect and agency, and religion and German colonialism (with a regional focus on Latin America and Brazil).

Elizabeth A. Davis
Associate Professor
Vice-Chair, Institutional Review Board (IRB)
Acting Director, Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities (IHUM), 2022-23
Office Phone
Office
122 Aaron Burr Hall

Elizabeth Davis is Associate Professor of Anthropology and a Behrman Faculty Fellow in the Humanities. Her research and writing, grounded in the European horizons and the Ottoman history of the Greek-speaking world, focus on the intersections of psyche, body, history, and power as areas for ethnographic and theoretical engagement. Her particular interest is in how the ties that bind people to communities and states are yielded and inflected by knowledge: that is, how certain kinds of truths mediate conceptions of self and conceptions of others – as psychiatric subjects, for example, or as subjects of history. Her first book, Bad Souls: Madness and Responsibility in Modern Greece (Duke University Press, 2012), is an ethnographic study of responsibility among psychiatric patients and their caregivers in the “multicultural” borderland between Greece and Turkey. She is currently working on her second book, The Good of Knowing: War, Time, and Transparency in Cyprus (forthcoming from Duke University Press), a collaborative engagement with Cypriot knowledge production about the violence of the 1960s-70s in the domains of forensic science, documentary film, and “conspiracy theory.”

Laurence Ralph
Professor;
Director of Center on Transnational Policing
Office Phone
Office
124 Aaron Burr Hall

Laurence Ralph is a Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. He earned both a PhD and also a Master of Arts degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, and a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgia Institute of Technology where he majored in History, Technology and Society. Laurence has published articles on these topics in various venues. In 2014 Laurence’s first book, Renegade Dreams: Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago, was published by the University of Chicago Press. This book grapples with the consequences of the “war on drugs” together with mass incarceration, the ramifications of heroin trafficking for HIV infected teenagers, the perils of gunshot violence and the ensuing disabilities that gang members suffer. Investigating this encompassing context allows him to detail the social forces that make black urban residents vulnerable to disease and disability. Renegade Dreams received the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) in 2015.  

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