(Trans)nationalism

  • Laurence Ralph

    Laurence Ralph is a Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. He earned both a PhD and also a Master of Arts degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, and a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgia Institute of Technology where he majored in History, Technology and Society. Laurence has published articles on these topics in various venues. In 2014 Laurence’s first book, Renegade Dreams: Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago, was published by the University of Chicago Press. This book grapples with the consequences of the “war on drugs” together with mass incarceration, the ramifications of heroin trafficking for HIV infected teenagers, the perils of gunshot violence and the ensuing disabilities that gang members suffer. Investigating this encompassing context allows him to detail the social forces that make black urban residents vulnerable to disease and disability. Renegade Dreams received the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) in 2015.  
  • Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús

    Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús, Ph.D. is a cultural and social anthropologist who has conducted ethnographic research with Santería practitioners in Cuba and the United States, and police officers and Black and Brown communities affected by police violence in the United States. Her research and teaching span the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, and Afro-Latinx circulations. Dr. Beliso- De Jesús’ work contributes to cultural and media studies, anthropology of religion, critical race studies, Black and Latinx transnational feminist and queer theory, African diaspora religions, and studies on police and militarization.
  • Abdellah Hammoudi

    Abdellah Hammoudi was Professor at the Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco, and the first holder of the Faisal Visiting Professorship at Princeton. He was the founding director of the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. Professor Hammoudi has done extensive work on the ethno-history of his native Morocco, fieldwork in Morocco, Libya and Saudi Arabia, as well as participated in major development projects in these three countries. His most recent book, Une saison à la Mecque, published by Le Seuil, Paris, in 2004, was translated into English: A Season in Mecca, Hill and Wang, 2006, as well as in several other languages including Arabic, Dutch, Italian and German.
  • Carol J. Greenhouse

    Carol Greenhouse is Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University.  Her research focuses on the discursive and experiential dimensions of state power, especially federal power in the United States, and the reflexive and critical connections – in the U.S. and elsewhere – between ethnography and democracy. Her courses take up themes from the ethnography of law and politics as engagements with both current events and anthropology’s disciplinary traditions.
  • John Borneman

    John Borneman is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at Princeton. He has conducted fieldwork in Germany and Central Europe, and in Lebanon and Syria. His research focuses on two sets of relationships: on the relation of the state and law to intimacy and practices of care; and on the relation of political identification, belonging, and authority to forms of justice, accountability, and regime change. He also works on questions of epistemology and knowledge in the public sphere, and on psychoanalytic understandings of the self, group formation, and political form. Professor Borneman teaches courses on the self, intersubjectivity, revolution, memory, and social theory.    
  • Nomi Stone

    Nomi Stone’s transnational research, spanning the Middle East and the United States, focuses on the politics and representation of difference in the context of contemporary war and its diasporic aftermath. Her current book manuscript in progress, "Human Technologies and the Making of American War" is a political phenomenology of American Empire. She earned a PhD in Anthropology at Columbia, an MFA in Poetry at Warren Wilson and has a Masters of Philosophy in Modern Middle East Studies from Oxford.

Subscribe to (Trans)nationalism