Politics

  • Laurence Ralph

    Laurence Ralph is a Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. He earned both a PhD and also a Master of Arts degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, and a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgia Institute of Technology where he majored in History, Technology and Society. Laurence has published articles on these topics in various venues. In 2014 Laurence’s first book, Renegade Dreams: Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago, was published by the University of Chicago Press. This book grapples with the consequences of the “war on drugs” together with mass incarceration, the ramifications of heroin trafficking for HIV infected teenagers, the perils of gunshot violence and the ensuing disabilities that gang members suffer. Investigating this encompassing context allows him to detail the social forces that make black urban residents vulnerable to disease and disability. Renegade Dreams received the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) in 2015.  
  • Abdellah Hammoudi

    Abdellah Hammoudi was Professor at the Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco, and the first holder of the Faisal Visiting Professorship at Princeton. He was the founding director of the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. Professor Hammoudi has done extensive work on the ethno-history of his native Morocco, fieldwork in Morocco, Libya and Saudi Arabia, as well as participated in major development projects in these three countries. His most recent book, Une saison à la Mecque, published by Le Seuil, Paris, in 2004, was translated into English: A Season in Mecca, Hill and Wang, 2006, as well as in several other languages including Arabic, Dutch, Italian and German.
  • Lawrence Rosen

    Lawrence Rosen is the William Nelson Cromwell professor of Anthropology at Princeton University and is both an anthropologist and a lawyer. His main interests are in the relation between cultural concepts and their implementation in social and legal relationships. His main fieldwork has been in North Africa; he has also worked as an attorney on a number of American Indian legal cases. His publications include Law as Culture: An Invitation, The American Indian and the Law (editor), Meaning and Order in Moroccan Society (co-author), Bargaining for Reality: The Construction of Social Relations in a Muslim Community, The Anthropology of Justice: Law as Culture in Muslim Society, and Other Intentions: Cultural Contexts and the Attribution of Inner States (editor). He teaches courses on law and anthropology, comparative religious systems, the American Indian and the law, and the theory of cultural systems. He received the Presidential Distinguished Teaching Award in 1997 and was a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar for 1997-98.
  • Serguei A. Oushakine

    Serguei Oushakine has conducted fieldwork in the Siberian part of Russia, as well as in Belarus and Kyrgyzstan. His research is concerned with transitional processes and situations: from the formation of newly independent national cultures after the collapse of the Soviet Union to post-traumatic identities and hybrid cultural forms. His first book The Patriotism of Despair: Loss, Nation, and War in Russia focused on communities of loss and exchanges of sacrifices in provincial post-communist Russia. His current project explores Eurasian postcoloniality as a means of affective reformatting of the past and as a form of retroactive victimhood. Oushakine’s Russian-language publications include edited volumes on trauma, family, gender and masculinity. Prof. Oushakine is Director of the Program in Russian and Eurasian Studies at Princeton.
  • Andrew Alan Johnson

    Andrew Alan Johnson’s research focuses upon the afterlife of environmental and economic catastrophe in the northern and northeastern region of Thailand. His first book, Ghosts of the New City, takes a historical look at the idea of the city in northern Thailand. Taking post-economic crisis Chiang Mai as a starting point, Johnson traces its transformation from Buddhist center to nationalist symbol to site of anxiety as the very idea of progress reaches a state of crisis. His current project looks at spectral sources of power in the lives of Lao-speaking fishermen and migrant workers from the Mekong River in the wake of massive dam projects and environmental disruption.
  • Carol J. Greenhouse

    Carol Greenhouse is Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University.  Her research focuses on the discursive and experiential dimensions of state power, especially federal power in the United States, and the reflexive and critical connections – in the U.S. and elsewhere – between ethnography and democracy. Her courses take up themes from the ethnography of law and politics as engagements with both current events and anthropology’s disciplinary traditions.
  • Julia Elyachar

    I am an anthropologist broadly trained in economics, history of political and economic thought, political economy, social theory, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic language. I received my Ph.D. from Harvard University in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies. My M.A. (Harvard University) is in Anthropology, and my B.A. (Barnard College, Columbia University) is in Economics, with a Political Economy emphasis. Before moving to UC Irvine, where I was Associate Professor of Anthropology and Economics and Director of the Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies, I taught and held research positions in Near Eastern Studies and at the International Center for Advanced Studies at New York University and at the Academy of Sciences and Arts in Ljubljana, Slovenia. I also draw on my training and professional experience in dance and improvisation as an ethnographer and teacher.
  • Lauren Coyle Rosen

    Colye Rosen's research and teaching interests lie at the intersections of legal and political anthropology, comparative spirituality, critical theory, moral economy, epistemology, ethics, subjectivity, psychoanalysis, and symbolic power. Her geographical focus is on Ghana and, more broadly, on Africa and the diaspora, as well as the U.S.

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