Law/Policing/Military

  • “PAW”: Professors Ralph and Beliso-De Jesús ‘Humanize the Data On Policing’

    Thursday, Jun 11, 2020

    Professor Laurence Ralph and American studies professor Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús work to bring together scholars at different levels to explore transnational issues in policing. “Putting a human face to victims, and to survivors’ stories of police violence, ‘gives them voice,’” says Ralph.

    Click here to read the full story, Together, Princeton Professors ‘Humanize the Data On Policing’

  • Lauren Coyle Rosen's new book: "Fires of Gold"

    Wednesday, Apr 22, 2020
    Fires of Gold: Law, Spirit, and Sacrificial Labor in Ghana is a powerful ethnography of the often shrouded cultural, legal, political, and spiritual forces governing the gold mining industry in Ghana, one of Africa’s most celebrated democracies. Lauren Coyle Rosen argues that significant sources of power have arisen outside of the formal legal system to police, adjudicate, and navigate conflict in this theater of violence, destruction, and rebirth.
  • Laurence Ralph

    Laurence Ralph is a Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. He earned both a PhD and also a Master of Arts degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, and a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgia Institute of Technology where he majored in History, Technology and Society. Laurence has published articles on these topics in various venues. In 2014 Laurence’s first book, Renegade Dreams: Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago, was published by the University of Chicago Press. This book grapples with the consequences of the “war on drugs” together with mass incarceration, the ramifications of heroin trafficking for HIV infected teenagers, the perils of gunshot violence and the ensuing disabilities that gang members suffer. Investigating this encompassing context allows him to detail the social forces that make black urban residents vulnerable to disease and disability. Renegade Dreams received the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) in 2015.  
  • Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús

    Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús, Ph.D. is a cultural and social anthropologist who has conducted ethnographic research with Santería practitioners in Cuba and the United States, and police officers and Black and Brown communities affected by police violence in the United States. Her research and teaching span the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, and Afro-Latinx circulations. Dr. Beliso- De Jesús’ work contributes to cultural and media studies, anthropology of religion, critical race studies, Black and Latinx transnational feminist and queer theory, African diaspora religions, and studies on police and militarization.
  • Satyel Larson

    Satyel Larson is an assistant professor specializing in women, gender, and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Her work is ethnographic, historical, and mostly based in Morocco. Her scholarship focuses on how legal, medical, and religious culture influence practices of kinship and reproduction, and on the flow of ideas and technologies of gender and sexuality between the Middle East, North Africa, and Western Europe. She has written on the politics of kinship, ethnicity, and Islamic identity in Maghrebi law and society.

  • Lauren Coyle Rosen

    Coyle Rosen’s research and teaching interests lie at the intersections of legal and political anthropology, comparative religion and spirituality, aesthetics and consciousness, subjectivity and epistemology, and critical theory. Her geographical focuses are on Ghana and on Africa and the diaspora, more broadly, as well as on the U.S.
  • John Borneman

    John Borneman is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at Princeton. He has conducted fieldwork in Germany and Central Europe, and in Lebanon and Syria. His research focuses on two sets of relationships: on the relation of the state and law to intimacy and practices of care; and on the relation of political identification, belonging, and authority to forms of justice, accountability, and regime change. He also works on questions of epistemology and knowledge in the public sphere, and on psychoanalytic understandings of the self, group formation, and political form. Professor Borneman teaches courses on the self, intersubjectivity, revolution, memory, and social theory.    
  • João Biehl

    João Biehl is Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology and Faculty Associate at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. Biehl’s main research and teaching interests center on medical and political anthropology, ethnography and critical theory, the social studies of science and technology, global health, pharmaceuticals, affect and agency, and religion and German colonialism (with a regional focus on Latin America and Brazil).
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