Environment/Infrastructure

  • Ryo Morimoto

    Through his ethnographic research, Morimoto aims to create a space for and language to think about nuclear things and other contaminants as part and parcel of what it means to live in the late industrial and post-fallout era, rather than as alien species that must and should be held at a distance from humans. Morimoto is currently working on a book project, tentatively titled The Nuclear Ghost: Atomic Livelihood in Fukushima’s Gray Zone. This book integrates environmental anthropology, recent Japanese history, and science and technology studies to understand the uses and applications of technologies in social processes whereby certain sensory-cognitive experiences are (im)materialized. Morimoto uses the term “nuclear ghost” to analyze the struggles of representing and experiencing low-dose radiation exposure in coastal Fukushima, where individual, social, political and scientific determinations of the threshold of exposure are often inconsistent.
  • Andrew Alan Johnson

    Andrew Alan Johnson’s research focuses upon the afterlife of environmental and economic catastrophe in the northern and northeastern region of Thailand. His first book, Ghosts of the New City, takes a historical look at the idea of the city in northern Thailand. Taking post-economic crisis Chiang Mai as a starting point, Johnson traces its transformation from Buddhist center to nationalist symbol to site of anxiety as the very idea of progress reaches a state of crisis. His current project looks at spectral sources of power in the lives of Lao-speaking fishermen and migrant workers from the Mekong River in the wake of massive dam projects and environmental disruption.
  • Julia Elyachar

    I am an anthropologist broadly trained in economics, history of political and economic thought, political economy, social theory, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic language. I received my Ph.D. from Harvard University in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies. My M.A. (Harvard University) is in Anthropology, and my B.A. (Barnard College, Columbia University) is in Economics, with a Political Economy emphasis. Before moving to UC Irvine, where I was Associate Professor of Anthropology and Economics and Director of the Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies, I taught and held research positions in Near Eastern Studies and at the International Center for Advanced Studies at New York University and at the Academy of Sciences and Arts in Ljubljana, Slovenia. I also draw on my training and professional experience in dance and improvisation as an ethnographer and teacher.
  • Lauren Coyle Rosen

    Colye Rosen's research and teaching interests lie at the intersections of legal and political anthropology, comparative spirituality, critical theory, moral economy, epistemology, ethics, subjectivity, psychoanalysis, and symbolic power. Her geographical focus is on Ghana and, more broadly, on Africa and the diaspora, as well as the U.S.
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