Princeton Food Project brings together farmers, chefs, scholars, artists, activists

Nov. 10, 2022

by Sarah Malone, Effron Center for the Study of America

A fall 2019 conversation over a buffet of recipes drawn from Frances Moore Lappé’s groundbreaking 1971 book Diet for a Small Planet germinated over the years since into an interdisciplinary collective, the Princeton Food Project, a Humanities Council Magic Grant for Innovation, which on Nov. 16 presents its first Farmer-to-Table conversation.

Farmer to table this November means “Sustainable Oystering,” on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 4:30 p.m. in Shultz Dining Room in Robertson Hall, with “Iron Chef” Anita Lo, cookbook author and for 17 years the owner and operator of the West Village restaurant Annisa, and Greenport, New York oyster farmers Mike and Isabel Osinky, owners and founders of Widow’s Hole Oyster Farm. Malin Pinsky, associate professor of ecology, evolution, and natural resources at Rutgers University, moderates.

Lo will conduct a cooking demo as part of her presentation, using Widow’s Hole oysters, followed by a reception with small seafood bites and a “learn to shuck” oyster shucking station.

“The Farmer-to-Table conversations are meant to bring about connections between our ideas of food at Princeton and the practices of people who work on farms and in kitchens, where they are innovating and developing new ways around sourcing, aesthetics, diets, and so much more,” said Tessa Lowinske Desmond, associate research scholar and lecturer in American studies.

This academic year, the Princeton Food Project is co-led by Desmond and Hanna Garth, assistant professor of anthropology and and affiliate faculty with the High Meadows Environmental Institute.

Read the full article on the Effron Center for the Study of America website:

Source: Princeton Food Project brings together farmers, chefs, scholars, artists, activists